Herb Gardens – How to Get the Most Out of Your Herb Gardens

Herb Gardens – How to Get the Most Out of Your Herb Gardens

So you want to know how to get the best results for your herb gardens?

I can relate to the way you feel since I had the same desire to get successful results from my herb gardening efforts.

Herbs the friend of physicians and the praise of cooks, has shared a loving relationship with man; they have been used since antediluvian times. In the middle Ages, herbs were often used to help preserve meat and cover the rotting taste of meals that couldn’t be refrigerated.

Herbs also helped disguise the stench of natives who bathed sporadically. Many of the early settlers grew herbs for seasoning their food, as well as, for their healing properties.

American Indians often used herbs for tanning and dyeing leather.There are biblical references and medieval paintings which proves the use of herbs in those times.

Extremely helpful to the gardener, herbs are grown for loads of reasons example, to flavor food, for tea, for medicine and surprisingly for pest control too are! The gardener can either choose to grow a specific herb or diverse species inside or al fresco with other plants.

Though there are about eighty different species of herbs, they can be broken down as; annuals, perennials, biennials, grasses, and bushes.Compost is not a basic when growing herbs; however, it is essential that the soil be of the correct composition to ensure proper growth of the plant.

If the earth is not well drained sand or gravel can be added to alleviate the herb should also be positioned so that it gets adequate light which too is vital for its growth.

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Herbs naturally repel pests; in hot dry temperatures look out for red mites on those that grow low and mildew may attack sage, tarragon and cilantro.

Rots, mildews and wilts will attack herbs, especially if plants are spaced too closely or grown in poorly drained soil. Poor ventilation and soggy soils promote fungal and bacterial growth above and below ground.